The Magican at the Winter Solstice ~ Christmas 2011

The Magician from Corrine Kenner's Victorian Christmas Tarot

I am writing this the day after the Winter Solstice in the Northern Hemisphere. Today marks the complete end of a yearly cycle. I have sometimes heard it referred to as The Year and a Day. That will mean many things to many people. What does it mean for me?

Today I stopped and allowed a kind of spiritual stillness to take over and in that moment of utter stillness, I was able to honour the past year with all its sorrows and joys… and let it go all at once. A bit later I found myself laughing and running with my dog amazed at the sheer magic of a life that allows us to begin again whenever it is needed, albeit occasionally by surprise and not of our own volition.

The Magician as archetype is that part of us that makes things happen. It is through his gifts that we are able to manipulate the energies of the Universe to provide us with our needs and manifest our desires. In order to do this we place ourselves at the centre of our Universe, our life, our myth, our story. It is only from that perspective that we can activate the special tools and talents we have been given, and we have all been given special tools and talents.

More and more I question whether it is even possible to successfully reach out to others until we have learned to know and love ourselves.  In the Magician we are given the tools to discover, and access, our higher self who becomes a doorway or gatekeeper to our own higher wisdom.  And finally (the truly magical part), we are able to take that wisdom and make practical use of it so that our lives become our Great Work.

However, it is the Christmas, or Yule, or Solstice, Season depending on your philosophical believe system. In true Sagittarian fashion, I celebrate them all. It is so easy to lose ourselves in a sea of faces, of sights, of smells, of wants. We now find ourselves at that point on the wheel when we are thinking of others and not ourselves. This is when we try to remember we are part of a tribe – a glorious, amazing, complex tribe. This is a time when we give to others. However, in the midst of all the hustle and bustle, stress and excitement, we may lose ourselves for a moment or two… or three.  So if you’ve become a bit lost, take a moment and put yourself at the centre of your life again and remember this is your life, your story, your magic.

“O, wind, if winter comes, can spring be far behind?” ~ Percy Bysshe Shelley

“I celebrate myself, and sing myself.” ~ Walt Whitman

As many of you know I have been working with energy of The Magician the latter part of this year and this work will continue on into next year culminating in a workshop I will be giving at the http://www.rivieratarotconference.co.uk/Tarot/Welcome.html in Devon. Don’t forget to put the 27th of October in your diaries!

This Magician is from the very fabulous Victorian Christmas Tarot by Corrine Kenner that we are still waiting for U.S. Game to release (some of us more patiently than others). Until then you can find the images of the Major Arcana (and even a guide book) at http://www.christmastarot.com/.


Tuesday 21 December 2010: Winter Solstice with Dixie

Illness has always brought me nearer to a state of grace.
Abbe Pierre

Dogs are miracles with paws. ~Attributed to Susan Ariel Rainbow Kennedy

This day was the Winter Solstice.

I hesitated to post this photo but it was the only one I took that day.

It was a bad day for Dixie. The day before she had had a stress test. It took a lot out of her. She still sleeps a lot but we occasionally see her happy cheerful self, waggy tail and all. Unfortunately, those outburst take a lot out of her and she has to sleep to recover.

Her illness isn’t terminal. It just feels terminal to me because I miss my happy, playful doggie so very much. She will have more tests after Christmas and hopefully we will have whatever is making her ill identified, out the door and forgotten.

In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer.
Albert Camus